The Masseria

The Origins

Jorche is situated on a little hill close to Torricella. White and majestic, the Masseria is a splendid, closed court in a rich Mediterranean garden. Its architectural structure, typical of the rural Salentine landscape, preserves the timeless fascination of ancient times and tells the story of these places.

In 1990, Antonio and Mariella Gianfreda fell in love with this Masseria, at that time abandoned and with its left wing completely collapsed, they bought it from the heirs of Baron Vito Bardoscia and began a long and laborious restoration work of the principle complex.

Later on, they also renovated the old stables and the magnificent half-underground oil mill, going back to XVIII century and today designated as restaurant.

Simplicity, care and hospitality
Living the Masseria

Our History

Masseria Jorche has a very ancient story: the construction of the most ancient part of the building dates back to the end of the XVII century, when Puglia was under the Spanish domination and the feudal system.

At the time, the Masserias were really and truly self-sufficient agricultural centres, composed by dwellings, animals’ shelters (sheeps, goats, cows, oxen, horses and courtyard animals), agricultural instruments and food stocks necessary to the survival of the inhabitants of the Masseria. Even Jorche had the function of agricultural business and was considered one of the biggest and most complete in the area.

The central building, made up of two floors, is the oldest part of the Masseria: the top floor was reserved for the owner and was used as storage for legumes and wheat, while in the bottom one, much bigger, all the workers in charge of the conduction of the Masseria lodged.

At the end of XIX century, Jorche reached its moment of maximum splendor when it became Baron Bardoscia’s property, a great landowner who, at the beginning of XX century, owned various Masserias in the area.

Iscriviti alla NEWSLETTER
per restare aggiornato sulle nostre offerte o iniziative

ISCRIVITI ALLA NEWSLETTER